245 St. Helier Avenue, Morden, London, SM4 6JH

Replacing missing teeth

If you have missing teeth, you may be thinking about replacing them to improve the way you look. But replacing missing teeth may also let you eat more comfortably, speak more clearly and help to keep your mouth healthy.

About replacing missing teeth

If you have teeth missing, it can affect the way the rest of your teeth bite together. Your remaining teeth may tilt and drift into the gaps and food can get trapped in the spaces. This can increase your risk of tooth decay and gum disease. If lots of your teeth are missing, your facial muscles can become saggy. This may affect the way you look, and make it harder for you to speak clearly.

There are different ways to replace missing teeth involving dentures, bridges and implants. Your dentist will help you decide which option is best for you.

Replacing missing teeth can help you smile with confidence, eat more comfortably and keep your mouth and teeth healthy.

Treatment options

If you have missing teeth, you may choose to do nothing and leave the space empty. Or you may want to replace them. Replacement teeth are made to match the colour of your natural teeth as closely as possible. Your options for treatment may include:

If you have missing teeth, you may choose to do nothing and leave the space empty. Or you may want to replace them. Replacement teeth are made to match the colour of your natural teeth as closely as possible. Your options for treatment may include:

  • dentures (false teeth) – removable plastic or metal frameworks that carry false teeth
  • bridges – false teeth that are fixed onto adjacent natural teeth
  • dental implants – false teeth fitted on top of a titanium implant that is fixed directly into your jawbone (the bone of your jaw then fuses to the titanium)

What’s best for you depends on the number of teeth you have missing. It also depends on which teeth are missing and the condition of your remaining teeth. Your dentist will help you decide which option is best for you and how much it will cost. Dentures and bridges are sometimes available on the NHS, dental implants usually aren’t.

Dentures

Full upper dentures cover the roof of your mouth (palate). A very thin layer of saliva between your palate and the denture creates suction, which keeps the denture firmly in position. Your facial muscles and tongue also help to keep it in place.

Full lower dentures are often more difficult to keep in place because there is less support from your gums. It can be difficult to balance the denture against your cheeks and tongue. However, this should improve with time as you get used to it.

Most people won’t need to use denture adhesive cream (fixative). However, some people may choose to use it because they find it helps with confidence while getting used to the new dentures.

MOUTH CANCER SYMPTOMS

Mouth cancer can appear in any part of your mouth including the floor of your mouth, roof, cheeks and gums. It can appear as a red (erythroplakia) or white patch (leukoplakia) persistent ulcers which refused to heal or as unusual lumps and swellings.

If you have any of these symptoms which do not heal within three weeks we recommend visiting your dentist.

To find out more about  risk factors, early diagnosis and treatment , please visit:  mouthcancer.org

Are you MouthAware?

Fluoride varnish

Fluoride varnish can be used to help prevent tooth decay or stop it getting worse. It is a safe, concentrated form of fluoride that helps to strengthen enamel and make it more resistant to attacks from acid.

The varnish comes as a fruity flavoured, yellow gel and can be given to children over three.

Treatment steps

  • We apply the fluoride varnish with a small, soft brush, which only takes a few minutes.
  • The varnish rapidly sets and can be brushed off after 4-12 hours.

The fluoride varnish is most effective when applied two to four times a year and should be used in conjunction with daily brushing.

We are dedicated to giving each of our patients the healthy smile they deserve!

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